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Cat. No. CHAN 0704 Price: £0 No. of discs: 1
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CHAN 0704 - Pasquini: Sonate per gravicembalo
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Marcello: Harpsichord Sonatas:
CHAN 0671(**)
 

Available From: 09 February 2004
Pasquini’s earliest biographers emphasise that during his apprenticeship in Rome, the composer took every opportunity to familiarise himself with the works of Frescobaldi and Palestrina. He made a copy in his own hand of the whole of Frescobaldi’s Primo libro delle fantasie, while he never ceased to be absorbed by Palestrina’s style, studying it by writing his compositions out in score. In fact, from his choice of teachers (some of the most illustrious musicians in Rome), his predilection for the art of Palestrina, and finally a career spent almost wholly in Rome with whose institutions he was closely connected throughout his life, a clear picture emerges of a musician who never lost his desire to assimilate – and so make himself a vehicle for carrying forward all that he had learned from his models.

With the exception of a small group of works printed within three collective volumes published between 1700 and 1720, Pasquini’s entire output for keyboard has come down to us in manuscript form. Only two are autographs – one in Berlin and one in the British Library. The Berlin autograph – which bears the title Sonate per Gravicembalo, composte dal Sig[nor] Bernardo Pasquini e scritte di sua mano in questo libro – is by far the most important source of Pasquini’s music. It must be noted that neither the description of its contents in the title nor the instrumental indication ‘gravicembalo’ is to be understood in a literal sense, for at the time, the term ‘sonata’ was used generically in opposition to that of ‘cantata’, to indicate an instrumental work, while at least one of the compositions is intended expressly for organ.
Reviews

Roberto Loreggians playing is admirable, with a subtle sense of rhythm and an ability to project the most intricate part-writing. In the long ricercar, he reels off the virtuoso figuration with complete ease. Keyboard enthusiasts will find this a rewarding release.
Early Music Review

'Roberto Loreggian's playing is admirable, with a subtle sense of rhythm and an ability to project the most intricate part-writing. In the long ricercar, he reels off the virtuoso figuration with complete ease. Keyboard enthusiasts will find this a rewarding release.'
Early Music Review

'The sound quality is first-rate, with Lorregian's Italian harpsichord and spinet comfortably set back in an attractive spacious drawing-room acoustic. Alessandro Borin's extended booklet notes are also a real bonus, despite some rather Italian musicologist-style obscurity of expression.'
International Record Review

'Not only does Lorregian adroitly nuance his articulation, phrasing and tempo shifts, but he switches from harpsichord to spinet, and changes stops on the harpsichord to vivify the brilliance hidden in Pasquini's score. The result charms and teases…'
BBC Music Magazine

'Loreggian, who plays all the music with great flair and sensitivity, uses a harpsichord by Riccardo Pergolis (imitating a late-17th Century model) tuned in quarter-comma meantone. The liner notes include extensive musicological commentary on Pasquini's life, the sources for the music, and perceptive descriptions of many of the pieces.'
American Record Guide

Loreggian, who plays all the music with great flair and sensitivity, uses a harpsichord by Riccardo Pergolis (imitating a late-17th Century model) tuned in quarter-comma meantone. The liner notes include extensive musicological commentary on Pasquinis life, the sources for the music, and perceptive descriptions of many of the pieces.
American Record Guide

The sound quality is first-rate, with Lorregians Italian harpsichord and spinet comfortably set back in an attractive spacious drawing-room acoustic. Alessandro Borins extended booklet notes are also a real bonus, despite some rather Italian musicologist-style obscurity of expression.
International Record Review

The excellent Roberto Lorregian brings an attractive improvisatory quality to his playing, starting some pieces with a flourish of his own and employing rubato here and there.
Gramophone

'The excellent Roberto Lorregian brings an attractive improvisatory quality to his playing, starting some pieces with a flourish of his own and employing rubato here and there.'
Gramophone

Not only does Lorregian adroitly nuance his articulation, phrasing and tempo shifts, but he switches from harpsichord to spinet, and changes stops on the harpsichord to vivify the brilliance hidden in Pasquinis score. The result charms and teases…
BBC Music Magazine

The excellent Roberto Lorregian brings an attractive improvisatory quality to his playing, starting some pieces with a flourish of his own and employing rubato here and there.
Gramophone

Roberto Loreggians playing is admirable, with a subtle sense of rhythm and an ability to project the most intricate part-writing. In the long ricercar, he reels off the virtuoso figuration with complete ease. Keyboard enthusiasts will find this a rewarding release.
Early Music Review

 

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