Logged
Out
Shopping Basket
 
Cat. No. CHAN 10299 H Price: £9 No. of discs: 1
CD Logo
CHAN 10299 - Tchaikovsky, B: The Wind of Siberia/ Sebastopol Symphony/Music for Orchestra
Download Hi-Res Artwork
Download Booklet as a PDF

Audio Sample
spacer

 

Available From: 07 March 2005
The Sebastapol Symphony (1980) was written about the port city on the Black Sea in the Crimea. Formally, it fits the universal mould for sea music: it begins with the portrayal of seagull cries and the tranquil rhythm of the waves, and is full of startlingly vivid visual imagery. It is interesting that Tchaikovsky himself had never visited Sebastopol prior to writing the symphony. He says:

One does not need to figure out whether the Sebastopol portrayed in the first Theme, or in the end, is the Sebastapol of 1942, or of today, or of the Crimean War of the nineteenth century. Itís all of them. I was more imagining that I could speed time forwards, or backwards, or I could freeze it, or that I could do all three at once.

Music for Orchestra (1987) is Tchaikovskyís penultimate major work. The piece consists of seven movements, the names of which suggest the trajectories taken by the composerís mind. Each movement follows without a pause Ė and this is not the only indication that the work is, in fact, one single piece. There are several main themes that continue throughout the work.

The symphonic poem The Wind of Siberia (1984) is dedicated to the conductor on this disc. The programme depicts both the huge, scarcely populated breadths of Russiaís north-east, with their stern beauty, and the fact that Siberia, for many years, served as the prison for political and criminal exiles. The unusual composition of the orchestra allows it to paint the cold colours of the north: the wind section comprises two flutes, two alto flutes, two clarinets, two alto clarinets, four trumpets and four trombones. The percussion group is predominantly focussed on bland, low timbres, headed by six timpanis, capable of forming powerful six-sound chords.
"The Sebastapol Symphony (1980) was written about the port city on the Black Sea in the Crimea. Formally, it fits the universal mould for sea music: it begins with the portrayal of seagull cries and the tranquil rhythm of the waves, and is full of startlingly vivid visual imagery. It is interesting that Tchaikovsky himself had never visited Sebastopol prior to writing the symphony. He says:

One does not need to figure out whether the Sebastopol portrayed in the first Theme, or in the end, is the Sebastapol of 1942, or of today, or of the Crimean War of the nineteenth century. Itís all of them. I was more imagining that I could speed time forwards, or backwards, or I could freeze it, or that I could do all three at once.

Music for Orchestra (1987) is Tchaikovskyís penultimate major work. The piece consists of seven movements, the names of which suggest the trajectories taken by the composerís mind. Each movement follows without a pause Ė and this is not the only indication that the work is, in fact, one single piece. There are several main themes that continue throughout the work.

The symphonic poem The Wind of Siberia (1984) is dedicated to the conductor on this disc. The programme depicts both the huge, scarcely populated breadths of Russiaís north-east, with their stern beauty, and the fact that Siberia, for many years, served as the prison for political and criminal exiles. The unusual composition of the orchestra allows it to paint the cold colours of the north: the wind section comprises two flutes, two alto flutes, two clarinets, two alto clarinets, four trumpets and four trombones. The percussion group is predominantly focussed on bland, low timbres, headed by six timpanis, capable of forming powerful six-sound chords.

"
Reviews

Boris Tchaikovsky is clearly an important composer. Some may dine him deceptively minimalist, modern, or even New Age at first hearing; but these are misconceptions. Tchaikovsky sounds only remotely like Shostakovich and not at all like Vaughan Williams, Prokofieff, or his more famous namesake; but his music fits into their orchestral world. Not only is it romantic; itís also haunting, involving and conducive to rehearings. From the evidence here, I have been introduced to a master.
American Record Guide

Sebastopol Symphony (1980) and Music for Orchestra (1987) move forward through selective and haunting changes of orchestral timbre and spare, often memorable melodic lines, hinting at familiar symphonic rhetoric but never settling on it for long. Iím reminded more of late Martinu than any Russian models in the free-flowing, beautifully scored string laments, and thereís even an intriguing hint of rainbow-coloured later minimalism as the Symphony becomes locomotive.
BBC Music Magazine

That Chandos should release this recording as a Ďhistoricalí CD might lead you to expect aged sound, but you neednít worry: itís slightly boxy, and lacks space at the climaxes, but thereís nothing to get between you and the music.
International Record review

 

Home : Classical Music Special Offers [Competitions] : Search [Browse : Catalogue : Advanced] : Your Account
Contact [Email Us : Call Us : Write To Us] :
Help [Troubleshooting : How To Order : Music Licensing.]
: The Site Map : Web Links: Complete Listing
: :