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Cat. No. CHAN 9800 Price: £5 No. of discs: 1
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CHAN 9800 - Tavener: Fall & Resurrection
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Available From: 16 March 2000
Fall and Resurrection is a deeply religious work. It tries to encompass, in brief glimpses, the events which have taken place since the beginning of time, but with reference to Christian doctrine. The work begins in total silence, in the Paradise of God. Building from this silence, deep hushed notes develop into a colossal storm, the pre-creation chaos. Out of this chaos God’s world is created, in which Adam and Eve sing to each other and to God. A rams-horn sounds The Fall, and the first section of the work closes with ‘Paradise lost’.

In the second section of the work, verses or hints from the prophets and the psalms are sung by the countertenor, interspersed with dance-like music for the kaval (a form of the nay flute). The third and final section, introduced by the organ represents an eternal act. At the moment of crucifixion, an apparent return to the thunderous cacophony of the uncreated chaos occurs.

Tavener says the work should be performed in a building with a large acoustic. The resonance of ancient instruments – the kaval, the rams-horn trumpet and the Tibetan temple bowls – brings to mind and soul something primordial, something lost, something innocent, something wild and untamed.
Fall and Resurrection is a deeply religious work. It tries to encompass, in brief glimpses, the events which have taken place since the beginning of time, but with reference to Christian doctrine. The work begins in total silence, in the Paradise of God. Building from this silence, deep hushed notes develop into a colossal storm, the pre-creation chaos. Out of this chaos God’s world is created, in which Adam and Eve sing to each other and to God. A rams-horn sounds The Fall, and the first section of the work closes with ‘Paradise lost’.

In the second section of the work, verses or hints from the prophets and the psalms are sung by the countertenor, interspersed with dance-like music for the kaval (a form of the nay flute). The third and final section, introduced by the organ represents an eternal act. At the moment of crucifixion, an apparent return to the thunderous cacophony of the uncreated chaos occurs.

Tavener says the work should be performed in a building with a large acoustic. The resonance of ancient instruments – the kaval, the rams-horn trumpet and the Tibetan temple bowls – brings to mind and soul something primordial, something lost, something innocent, something wild and untamed.
Reviews

Nowhere will this music sound better than in St Paul’s Cathedral. Rozario, Chance, Martyn Hill and Stephen Richardson were adept soloists and the combination of the BBC Singers and St Paul’s Cathedral Choir could hardly be bettered.
The Financial Times

The performers excelled.’
The Observer

‘The performers excelled.’
The Observer

‘Patricia Rozario sang the fiendishly difficult soprano part marvellously.’
The Sunday Telegraph

Patricia Rozario sang the fiendishly difficult soprano part marvellously.
Sunday Telegraph

‘Nowhere will this music sound better than in St Paul’s Cathedral. Rozario, Chance, Martyn Hill and Stephen Richardson were adept soloists and the combination of the BBC Singers and St Paul’s Cathedral Choir could hardly be bettered.’
The Financial Times

 

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